Inner vs Outer Conch

conch-piercingA Conch Piercing is one of the more unusual ear piercing types, even though it’s popular with some people. It is one of the cartilage piercings, which makes it a bit trickier to perform than earlobe piercings. Cartilage piercings also tend to be more painful. However, this is not a reason to give up if you really desire to have a Conch Piercing.

There is a certain confusion about Conch Piercings. Namely, there are two distinctive types of Conch Piercings: Inner and Outer Conch. People sometimes confuse the two and are unsure about their similarities and differences. If you wish to get one of those (or both!) you need to know which is which and what their main differences are.

Inner Conch Piercing

Inner Conch is by far the more popular variant. If no closer distinction is mentioned, chances are that “Conch” will refer to Inner Conch piercing. Inner Conch is done on the specific part of the cartilage in the center of the ear, adjacent to the ear canal. There is a small cup-shaped area that is pierced.

This specific placement is characteristic of Inner Conch. All Inner Conch piercings are done on this cup-shaped cartilage area, or else the piercing in question cannot even be considered “Inner Conch”.

If the area is large enough, it is possible to have a large gauge Inner Conch piercing. However, the only way to achieve this is with a dermal punch. Cartilage piercings are almost impossible to stretch properly, so if you want to have a larger Inner Conch piercing it’s best to go with a dermal punch.

Outer Conch Piercing

Outer Conch piercing is a more unusual placement. It is performed on the flat part of the ear cartilage, ideally between the helix and the antihelix of the ear. The placement itself is tricky, because it has to be done on this specific spot to “count” as an Outer Conch piercing, or else it would be a simple Helix or Antihelix piercing.

In fact, these spots on the cartilage are located near each other so there is often some confusion whether the piercing in question is Outer Conch or not. Ideally, an Outer Conch piercing should be done on the cartilage but away from the rim/edge, unless you are going for a Helix piercing.

However, those who do not care about the names and simply want a piercing on this particular spot have nothing to worry about – you can simply tell your chosen piercer the exact spot where you wish to be pierced. You don’t need to know the name of the piercing or stress about getting it right.

Another way to perform an Outer Conch piercing is through dermal punching. This way, it is relatively easy to have a large gauge piercing in the cartilage, which would otherwise be very difficult (or impossible) to achieve.

Inner vs Outer Conch: The Verdict

As you can see, Inner and Outer Conch Piercings are very similar (hence the name), so it’s easy to confuse one for the other. Both are cartilage piercings done on the inner side of the ear, though Inner Conch is more so (as the name implies).

The main difference is the placement: Inner Conch has a very specific placement on the cup-shaped area near the ear canal. Outer Conch doesn’t have a special placement so there is more freedom when performing this piercing type.

Another potential difference is jewelry. Typically, Outer Conch allows for more space and freedom when choosing jewelry (for example, Captive Bead Rings), while the Inner Conch typically uses simple studs. However, this is not set in stone and there is always room for some experimentation.

Piercing Blowout

Piercing BlowoutOne of the worst things that can happen to you when you try to stretch your piercing is blowout.

This is a relatively rare thing, but you need to know that it can happen.

That’s why it’s so important to go slowly when it comes to stretching and be very responsible in this aspect.

What is a Blowout?

A blowout can happen when a piercing is stretched too fast. It usually happens when your piercing is not ready but you force it to stretch anyway. Typically, it occurs when you force a taper or a jewelry piece through your piercing to stretch it to a larger gauge.

What happens is that a piercing that’s not ready gets hurt. The skin from the piercing gets forcibly pushed through the piercing and it exits on the back o the piercing hole. As a result, you get a flap of skin or tissue hanging from the back of the piercing. That is what is considered a blowout.

This happens when a skin tunnel (called fistula) is forced on the back of the piercing through the pressure applied. This is what creates a lip around the edge of your piercing. This blowout may be very small initially, but it may grow significantly, especially if you continue to stretch your piercing even further.

A blowout is a huge aesthetic problem, but it gets even worse than that. Once you get a blowout you won’t be able to stretch this piercing further and it might affect the piercing completely so you won’t be able to wear any jewelry anymore.

A blowout can also cause further medical issues, such as tingling and discomfort. In some cases it can even lead to an infection. It’s clear a blowout is a nasty problem you don’t want to have.

Luckily, there is a way to remedy this problem. However, it’s important not to freak out and to be patient.

How to Treat a Blowout

One of the first things you can do is to downsize your piercing. The easiest way to achieve this is by inserting smaller jewelry (jewelry of the smaller gauge). This can help the blowout tissue to get reabsorb into the body so the problem is remedied. It is vital to replace the jewelry straight away or else the stretched piercing will heal in this blown-out shape. Once it’s happen it will be very difficult to remedy the problem.

In addition to this, it’s vital to make the tissue heal the best you can in order to remedy the problem. Wash your hands carefully and make sure to use only sterilized jewelry for your blown-out piercing. Use gentle saline solution to soak your piercing with a blowout in order to make it heal. This is similar to usual piecing aftercare, but it’s worth to keep the saline solution for longer. Make sure to use a cup with a saline solution that is tall enough to cover all of your piercing (in the case of stretched earlobes, make sure that the cup covers your whole ear). This is a good way to make your tissue heal and remove the bad effects of a blowout. Just make sure to use a new plastic cup every time you apply the saline solution.

In addition to this, you should also use plenty of oils to massage into your ear. The best oils to use are vitamin E oil, jojoba oil, emu oil, caster oil, tea tree oil, olive oil and coconut oil. Use the oil of your choice about 2-3 times per day. Rub it gently on the blowout and massage it. It’s best to use it when the blowout is new and fresh, so it’s important to start doing that straight away.

While you’re doing this cleaning and rubbing the oil, make sure to observe your piercing to see how it’s doing. Notice the shape and size of the blowout and see if it’s getting better. It should show the signs of healing after several days. If it stays red and swollen or if it hurts, you should seek medical help.

Whatever you do, do not attempt to stretch your piercing again until your blowout is gone and your piercing is fully healed. It’s important to be patient. It will take about one month before you can attempt to stretch your piercing again.

Stretching with Tapers: Things to Consider

Economy Insertion Tapers

Economy Insertion Tapers

Stretching with tapers is a very common method for stretching your piercing. In fact, it is the most common method you can apply. Tapers are affordable and easy to use, so it’s not surprising many people decide to give it a go and use tapers to stretch their piercings.

Unfortunately, not everybody knows how to use tapers properly. It’s important to note that while tapers are very common and relatively easy to use, they are not always used in the optimal way. They may seem intuitive but there are also many mistakes you can make while trying to stretch your piercings using tapers.

In order to avoid all of these mistakes, here are some things to keep in mind:

  • To use this method properly, make sure to always insert the narrower end of the taper into the piercing first. This is your current gauge and the taper will gradually widen to the new, larger gauge. Never use a wide end of a taper first!
  • You need to go slowly and gently. Push the taper in until you reach the wider end. This should not be painful even though you may feel a bit of discomfort. When you reach the wider end, stop. Take your new jewelry and line it up with the wide end of the taper. Only then you should push the rest of the taper through your piercing. Make sure to keep the jewelry aligned with the wider end of the taper so you can push the new jewelry in, too.
  • Once you’re done you have stretched your piercing to a larger gauge. Make sure there’s no blood and no cuts or tears. If everything is fine, it means you’re done.
  • Tapers are specially designed for stretching and should not be worn as body jewelry. While they may look stylish and unique, keep in mind that they are not made to be worn as jewelry, especially not for a prolonged period of time. This is particularly true for acrylic tapers.
  • In order for this process to work, make sure to never skip gauges (sizes). It’s vital to go gauge by gauge. This is why it’s so important to use all of the tapers in a kit or to order individual tapers of all sizes, one by one.
  • When stretching, it’s important to be patient. Never stretch your piercing before you give it a time to heal after the previous stretching. You should never “jump” to stretch to yet a bigger size quickly.
  • Generally speaking, you should wait at least a few weeks before two sizes (gauges). It means that you need to use a new taper every several weeks or so (or once per month only, depending on your piercing and the way it heals).
  • In order to make the whole process smoother and easier, use a drop of lubricant. Apply lubricant to both your ear (or the body part where piercing is located) and the taper. In some cases you might even want to lubricate the jewelry.
  • Keep in mind that tapers are ideal for smaller gauges and this is where they work the best. “Smaller” here means anything under 00, which is still large enough for many people. However, if this is not what you want and if you wish to stretch to at even larger gauges it’s better to use a different method for more gradual and problem-free stretching.

Choosing a Taper

When choosing a taper, pay attention to:

  • Size to use. The size of the taper to use will directly depend on the gauge you have and the gauge you wish to achieve. Most piercings start at very small gauges (think 18 gauge or 16 gauge), so even stretching to 14 gauge requires a taper to be used. (Or another method, of course, but tapers seem to work the best). In order to use tapers properly, you need to know your current gauge at all times.
  • Material. Tapers come in many different materials. Acrylic tapers are flexible and comfortable, so they provide a better stretching experience. On the other hand, Surgical Steel tapers are more secure. They can be autoclaved, which makes them more body-friendly.
  • Shape. While tapers have a general shape there are certain variations between different designs. Some tapers have a special smooth finish to make stretching process more comfortable. Others offer a special way to connect jewelry to the taper securely and thus make the whole process easier. Other tapers are specially designed to slide in and out with least force. You need to know of different shapes and designs in order to be able to choose the best taper for yourself.

After Stretching

  • Always treat any stretched piercing as a new, fresh piercing. Guess what? This is exactly what a stretched piercing is. Luckily, the healing time for this sort of piercing is shorter than for the original piercing, but you should still treat it as a new piercing.
  • As a new piercings, newly stretched piercings require aftercare, at least in the first couple of days. Clean them twice per day with a saline solution or another appropriate product. Do not use harsh chemicals on your newly stretched piercings!
  • You may also try sea salt soaks to treat your newly stretched piercing.
  • If you notice any pain or discomfort after stretching, make sure to pay attention. In case of an infection or another problem, seek medical help. Stretched piercings typically do not cause so much trouble, but you need to be aware of the risks.

Nipple Piercing for Men

Male Nipple PiercingNipple piercing is among the most popular piercings in the world.

While it was once considered alternative and unusual, it’s getting more and more mainstream acceptance these days.

It’s therefore not surprising that there are so many people who wish to get this piercing, and many of these people are men.

Men and Nipple Piercings

While some people think nipple piercings are mostly for women or that they suit women better, the truth is that both men and women can have a nipple piercing without a problem. Sure, there are differences in sizes of the nipple (and often, the nipple’s position), but other than that, a female nipple piercing and a male nipple piercing are very similar to each other.

The placement is made in the same way, at the base of the nipple. It’s important not to get pierced the areola, since it can lead to complications (though not necessarily).

Even the jewelry is basically the same. Most men with nipple piercings, just like women with nipple piercings, wear straight barbells in their piercing. However, some men prefer to wear Captive Bead Rings instead. This is very similar to the way women choose to wear their nipple jewelry. The main difference is that male jewelry will typically be less ornamented. Also, women tend to wear nipple shields more than men, but this is not the rule.

Other than this, male nipple piercings are basically the same as female nipple piercings.

Male Nipple Piercing Info

Here are some important things you need to know about male nipple piercings:

  • The piercing is typically performed in gauge 14 and up. Many men can best accommodate 14 gauge nipple piercing, though some men can use gauge 12 if their nipples are large enough.
  • Typical healing time for male nipple piercing is 4 to 6 months.
  • Nipple piercing will make the nipple more erect, slightly larger and more sensitive.
  • Just like female nipple piercing, it’s important not to make the piercing too deep into the areola. It prolongs the healing time and increases the risk of infections and other problems.
  • Too shallow piercings have an increased risk of migration and rejection. This is why a nipple piercing should never be done near the tip of the nipple.
  • Men can successfully stretch their nipples or wear heavier jewelry pieces in their nipple piercing without a problem.

Nostril Jewelry Fitting

Nostril Jewelry FittingNostril piercing is among the most popular piercings in the world, so it’s not surprising there are many beautiful jewelry pieces to go with it. You may choose between several different nose jewelry styles that are specially designed for this type of piercing or you may use multifunctional jewelry that will accommodate almost any piercing. When choosing your nose jewelry, however, you need to make sure that the chosen jewelry piece fits your requirements. Here are some tips on how to ensure that.

Know Your Size

The most important thing is to know the gauge you are pierced with, because it will determine the size of the jewelry you need to get. Of course, if you have a stretched piercing you will need to know your current gauge. Whatever you do, knowing your gauge is absolutely needed because you won’t be able to find the appropriate jewelry that fits if you are unsure about the gauge.

If you don’t know the gauge you may take your older nose jewelry and use a gauge wheel to measure it. If everything else fails, go to your piercer to consult them about the gauge size you need to buy.

Another measurement to keep in mind is the length of the post. Most nostril jewelry pieces have a post so you need to know how long it has to be to accommodate you. This size is individual and jewelry is made to accommodate most people. However, there are also some jewelry styles that can be easily customized if general sizes don’t fit you.

How to Ensure a Perfect Fit

Here are some additional tips on how to ensure a great fit or your nostril piercing jewelry:

  • If a jewelry piece leaves a gap between the flesh and the top of the jewelry, it means that the post of the jewelry is a bit too long for you. The decorative top of the jewelry should be just at the nostril u4level. If it sticks out, it means you need a bit shorter post.
  • Similarly, if decorative part of jewelry sinks in, it’s a sign that the post is too short. You will need jewelry with a longer post.
  • If the end part of the nose screw sticks out at the bottom of the nostril, it means you’ll need a bit shorter jewelry. If it’s not possible for your to find a shorter nose screw you can use a different jewelry type, such as a nose bone.
  • If your piercings starts to feel a little sore, it might be a sign that your jewelry is not properly fitted or that you need to try a different style. Experiment with different jewelry types until you find what works the best for you.
  • In case it’s very difficult to find any jewelry type that fits, the problem may be in your piercing. You might be pierced too high or too low, which makes it difficult to find appropriate jewelry. Also, unconventional placements sometimes make it tricky to find jewelry that fits. If this is your case, consult your piercer for tips on how to choose the best jewelry for your unique piercing.

Are Ear Piercings Painful?

Ear Piercings PainfulEar piercings are generally considered to be the least painful of them all. Everybody knows about earlobe piercing. This is such a popular type of a piercing and fully socially accepted that it’s often not even considered a “real” piercing. It is also considered to be relatively pain-free. Even people who otherwise dislike piercings often have pierced earlobes.

The fact that earlobe piercing is done relatively easily and pain-free makes people believe that ear piercings are not painful in general. The truth is, there is a huge difference between a simple earlobe piercing and other ear piercing types. Some of ear piercings are actually more complex and painful. Cartilage piercings are known to be very sensitive. This is why it’s important to get informed about a particular piercing type you wish to get, to learn about the pain levels and other facts about this piercing.

Cartilage Piercings

As stated above, cartilage piercings tend to be more painful than the others. While each person is an individual and while there are no hard and fast rules on this, cartilage piercings do tend to be more painful than one might expect. They are certainly more painful than earlobe piercings, so one should not assume these piercing types are similar at all. They are both done on the ear, true, but they are very different types of piercings.

Also, cartilage piercings are sometimes known to be painful than other body piercings. For example, tongue piercing may look very painful but in reality, the pain level is lover than with many other piercings. Similarly, ear cartilage piercings tend to be more painful than people think.

That not to say that ear cartilage piercings are excruciating. The procedure is done relatively quickly and the pain is short. It is definitely possible to go through this procedure without trauma, and it’s definitely true that ear cartilage piercings are not the most painful of them all. That being said, it’s also vital to know that they tend to be a bit more painful than they look. As such, they might not be recommended to people who are very scared of pain or who wish to get their first piercing. It’s better to get more experience and then try ear cartilage piercings.

Also, it’s vital to get informed. Read as much as you can about this type of piercing to learn about the procedure and other aspects of these piercings. Also, consult your chosen piercer. A good piercer will be able to walk you through all the steps of the piercing process and explain everything you need to know. With this information at hand, getting an ear cartilage piercing is easy.

Stretched Ear Piercings

Another type of ear piercing you may wonder about are stretched piercings. Most commonly, this involves stretched earlobes, but some other piercing types can be stretched as well. With cartilage piercings, however, it gets tricky – these are very difficult to stretch.

What about stretched earlobes, then? Are they painful? The good news is that they start out as any other earlobe piercing. The hole is then gradually stretched to a larger gauge. This process has to be gradual in order to allow the ear time to heal and become stronger before the next stretching stage. It means that you need to go slowly and gradually. This process should not be painful. It may cause minor discomfort but it should never tear or damage the tissue, and it should not cause pain.

Is Earlobe Piercing a “Real” Piercing?

Circular_barbellFor many piercing enthusiasts and general public, earlobe piercings are not “real” piercings. These are often not considered piercings in the true sense of the word, even though there is no much difference between them and any other piercing type, if we talk in technical terms. However, the way earlobe piercings are perceived differ greatly to that of other piercing.

Pierced earlobes (usually considered as: “pierced ears”) are fully socially acceptable, particularly for women. They are fully accepted to the point of not being considered a body modification at all.

The Earlobe Piercing

Technically speaking, the earlobe piercing is just like any other body piercing. It is performed on the body by piercing a hole through the tissue. It is the same mechanism as any other piercing type. As such, earlobe piercings are real and true body piercings.

What makes them different than other piercings is the public’s perception and level of acceptance. Earlobe piercings are socially acceptable in ways that other body piercings are not. This is particularly true for women, but even men with pierced earlobes do not face social stigma as much as people with other types of body piercings.

Earlobe piercing is so widespread that it’s often done on babies and infants. While it raises numerous ethical questions it’s very common to see a young child with pierced earlobes. Again, it is not considered unusual or on the same level as any other body modification.

Earlobe piercing is so popular – it is the most popular piercing in the world. One good thing about this is that it’s socially acceptable and easily made. All piercing studios in the world offer it and all piercers know how to perform it. However, the popularity of this piercing also means one downside: since earlobe piercings are so popular and not even considered “real” piercings, it may seem that anybody can perform it properly.

This is how you get all those botched earlobe piercings performed by friends or other non-professionals. This is how you get a bad practice of performing ear piercings with a piercing gun. Piercing guns are bad and should never be used to perform any kind of a piercing, including earlobe piercing. However, since earlobe piercings are often not considered piercings in the true sense of the word, some people think different rules apply. This is not correct: earlobe piercings are true piercings, even though the majority of people do not see them this way.

One Exception: Stretched Lobes

There is one huge exception to the general rule, though. Stretched earlobes are not considered an ordinary “ear piercing” and are seen as a more serious body modification. Even though most of them start as nothing more but an ordinary earlobe piercing, once you start stretching, especially to large gauges, the difference in perception shows.

As such, stretched lobes are considered more extreme and serious. They are not as socially acceptable as “regular” earlobe piercings. This is why some employers still prohibit their workers from having stretched lobes or force them to hide the lobes (or any other type of a “true” piercing).

Stretched lobes are considered a bigger deal even among the piercing enthusiasts. They are more difficult to get than regular earlobe piercing (since they require care and skill of stretching), and they are also more noticeable. Stretched lobes use specific types of jewelry, such as ear plugs and flesh tunnels, so it’s another thing that makes them different than “regular earlobe piercings”.

What about Other Ear Piercing Types?

Other types of ear piercings (done on parts of the ear other than the earlobe) are getting more and more popular and also more socially accepted. It is not uncommon to see a person with numerous ear cartilage piercings or other ear piercings. Some people who don’t like piercings in general will get multiple ear piercings.

As such, ear piercings are generally accepted among general public. That being said, most of these ear piercings are considered “real” piercings, unlike the earlobe piercing. It’s also uncommon (and often illegal) to pierce a baby’s ear on any other place than the earlobe. For these reasons, these ear piercings are considered true piercings, even though they are not perceived as extreme as some other forms of body piercings.

Dermal Punches

Dermal PunchDermal punch is a special tool designed to make a hole in the tissue. It is used in medicine, for performing biopsies, where tissue is taken for the analysis. Dermal punches are also used for body modification since they can create larger holes than a standard needle.

This way, it’s possible to make a large gauge piercing straight away, so stretching isn’t needed.

How it’s Used

A dermal punch has a sharp, round blade resembling a mini cookie cutter. It is made to pierce the tissue in a circle so a round hole is created during procedure. The process is known to be more painful than regular piercing procedure performed with needles, and it also carries some added risks of infections.

However, it offers certain advantages so it’s used in situations when a client wants and instant large-gauge piercing, especially on body parts that are not known to stretch well.

While dermal punches are more invasive than needles, it’s important to note that smaller punches are healed just like any other piercing. It means that the piercer will insert initial jewelry in your new piercing after the procedure is over and you’re good to go.

However, dermal punches larger than 6 gauge have to be healed in a special way. With these dermal punches, it’s important to remove initial jewelry after a few days to encourage faster healing. At the same time, it’s important to pay attention because piercings without jewelry tend to shrink, so it’s important to let it heal on it’s own but still remain open at the gauge you prefer.

Some of the most popular piercings using dermal punches are earlobe piercings and cartilage piercings. Also, some nose piercings are done using a dermal punch, especially if a client wants a large gauge nose piercing. Dermal punches are also used for some punch and taper surface piercings.

It’s important to note that while dermal punches create large gauge holes, they also limit the tissue’s ability to stretch further (using conventional piercing stretching methods). That’s why dermal punches are not typically used for piercings other than those listed above.

Dermal Punch for Cartilage Piercing

Dermal punches are very popular for cartilage piercings, since cartilage is difficult or impossible to stretch. Doing a piercing with a dermal punch ensures a large gauge cartilage piercing right from the start. This is a good choice if you wish to have a 6 gauge and even larger initial cartilage piercing.

Also, dermal punches are useful for cartilage piercings because they reduce the pressure that a new piercing puts on the tissue. This pressure often leads to scar tissue and other problems in cartilage piercings, so using a dermal punch is a way to minimize this issue.

When performing a procedure using a dermal punch, it’s important to keep the area well-lit in order to notice all of the important blood vessels under the skin. This is particularly important for cartilage piercings. Since ear cartilage is thin it’s possible to see the vessels relatively easily. Using a source of light will help the piercer decide on the best placement and the least invasive spot to perform the procedure.

Eyebrow Piercing

Eyebrow PiercingEyebrow piercings are among the most popular facial piercings in the world and one of the most popular piercings in general. It is not uncommon for people to have this one as their only piercing. While it’s very popular with young people eyebrow piercings are common among all the demographics.

Piercing and Procedure

Eyebrow piercing is typically done vertically through the ridge of the eyebrow. Depending on the person’s anatomy and wishes, the placement and orientation of the piercing can be different. Many eyebrow piercings are done at a slight angle but are still considered to be vertical piercings. Other placements and orientations are also possible, though they are generally considered to be variations of the general eyebrow piercing.

What is important to know about eyebrow piercing is that it’s a surface piercing, albeit the most famous of them all. However, as a surface piercing it is prone to some of the common problems other surface piercings face, such as migration and rejection.

Eyebrow piercings are not particularly difficult to perform, though it’s vital to go to a reliable piercing studio and hire and experienced piercer. The procedure is typically performed using a cannula needle. Some piercers use clamps for easier guidance. The needle is inserted through the bottom of the eyebrow and it exits through the top of the eyebrow. The exact placement is decided based on the client’s wishes and piercer’s recommendation.

Typically, eyebrow piercings are pierced with needles ranging from 18 gauge to 12 gauge. However, 16 gauge seems to be particularly common, though 14 gauge and 12 gauge are also popular.

Jewelry

Since eyebrow piercings are done in gauges ranging from 18 gauge to 12 gauge this is the range of the jewelry sizes used for this piercing. As with any other piercing, it’s crucial t know the gauge you’re pierced with so you can wear appropriate jewelry.

Typical jewelry for eyebrow piercings are curved barbells. While general curved barbells can be used there are also curved barbells made specially for eyebrow piercings.

Other jewelry choices are also common. For example, some people prefer to wear Captive Bead Rings while others opt for different type of barbells (usually curved barbells though some even choose to wear straight barbells).

The jewelry puts pressure on the piercing, which can increase the risk of migration, rejection and other problems. This is why it’s so crucial to use jewelry that is comfortable and has a perfect fit for the piercing. It’s important to minimize the pressure in order to protect the piercing and minimize the risk of migration and rejection.

Additional Info and Tips

  • The eyebrow can be pierced anywhere above the eye, so there are many different placements possible. The furthest away one can go is to the edge of the eyebrow by the temple.
  • It is also possible to pierce an eyebrow further away above the eye, but this is a more risky procedure because of the presence of supra-orbital nerves.
  • Eyebrow piercings can be done in pairs and groups, depending on the wishes.
  • If done horizontally, this piercing is known as a horizontal eyebrow piercing.
  • A variant of this piercing is done underneath the eye. This one is known an anti-eyebrow piercing.
  • The healing time for this piercing is about 6 to 8 weeks for the initial healing. Full healing can take anywhere from 6 months to a year.
  • Eyebrow piercings are known to produce crusts and discharge during healing. However, if you notice an abnormal amount of discharge or other problems, make sure to consult a medical professional. Same goes for any pain or prolonged swelling you may encounter.
  • The larger gauge is less likely to migrate and reject, so it’s better to be pierced at a larger gauge (for example, 14 gauge or 12 gauge) to minimize the risk of migration and rejection.

Will My Piercing Bleed?

Piercing BleedingMany people wonder if their new piercing will bleed and, if yes, for how long. It’s important to note that there is no one, universal answer to this question. Most of the piercings will bleed a little, at least initially. However, this bleeding should not be prolonged. How long the piercing will bleed depends on many factors, so it’s always vital to ask your piercer to explain you the details about your chosen piercing.

Piercings and Bleeding

Since piercings are perforations made on the tissue, it’s not surprising that some bleeding will occur. That being said, not all piercings bleed, and some bleed very little. Other piercings are known for more extended bleeding, so you need to know about it.

It’s also important to know that bleeding occurs during the procedure, but it will be cleaned immediately by your piercer. You should not be worried about this bleeding, as long as you are healthy. If you do have some sort of a condition that might interfere with this process (such as hemophilia) you should consult your doctor before getting a piercing done and you should always inform your piercer about any medical condition you might have.

He initial bleeding will be cleaned at the studio and you will go home. This is where you might notice additional bleeding during the following hours. It’s important to talk to your piercer and ask about the bleeding so you can be informed and know what to expect. It is also vital because you need to know if the bleeding you experience is normal or if there is something wrong about it.

Most piercings do bleed a little after the procedure, but this bleeding should not be extensive nor prolonged. You should not bleed for days or weeks. The only exception are some genital piercings: these are known to bleed for days after the procedure. This is why it’s important to ask your piercer about what to expect.

How Much will it Bleed?

There are several factors that determine how much a piercing will bleed:

  • Piercing type (body part that is pierced). This is by far the most important factor. Different body parts bleed differently, so it largely depends on the type of your piercing.
  • Gauge. Typically, large gauge piercings bleed more at the beginning, but this is not always a rule.
  • Instruments. The instrument used to perform a piercing will also contribute to potential bleeding. For example, piercing guns are more invasive than a piercing needle, and they tear the tissue. Not that you should ever get pierced with a gun.
  • Your anatomy. Your individual anatomy may make the procedure easier or more difficult, which may contribute to bleeding.
  • Your health. It’s important to be healthy when you go to get a piercing. It can contribute to many things, including the bleeding level.
  • Jewelry. Sometimes, the initial jewelry contributes to bleeding. Your jewelry should be fitted nicely to minimize any pressure and damage to the tissue in order to avoid bleeding. Needless to say, you need to use medical-grade jewelry and avoid any cheap, poorly made jewelry for your fresh piercing.

What to Do?

It’s easy to handle the bleeding. Use a cotton pad or a fresh tissue and apply it to the piercing with a gentle pressure. Do your best not to disturb the piercing. In some cases, applying ice to the affected area may also help, and it may also reduce the swelling.

In case of excessive and prolonged bleeding, or any type of discomfort, make sure to consult your doctor to check everything is fine. You may also visit your piercer, but do not ignore a doctor’s advice.